What is the Taurid meteor shower?

The Taurid meteor shower is also known as the Taurid meteor stream or Taurid meteor swarm. This shower is an annual meteor display that occurs every November in the Northern Hemisphere and is visible with the naked eye. The stream appears as shooting stars in the sky and is a welcome spectacle by onlookers every year.

The Torrid meteor stream is actually a giant complex array of debris 30 million kilometres wide, and has two separate parts. A north and south component. The Northern Taurids are believed to have originated from Asteroid named ‘2004 TG10’. The Southern stream is believed to have originated from ‘Comet Encke’. Both Encke and TG10 are believed to remnants of a much larger comet that fragmented over time. Due to its size the stream takes Earth a few weeks to pass through it, during our orbit.

Recently astrologists and scientists have observed impacts on the moon from the Taurid meteor stream. This has lead to interest in studying data regarding the chances for an impact on earth if a large enough fragment from the stream broke through the atmosphere.